If your team has not worked remotely before, it can be a big and unsettling change from the routine of working in an office environment. Suddenly there are more distractions and temptations within arm’s reach, to say nothing of pets or kids or noisy neighbors.  As a manager, your team will look up to you and follow the direction and example you set. It’s possible to work successfully from home, after making some adjustments in expectations and priorities.  Here’s how to establish realistic goals for success while working remotely: 

Whether due to record-breaking success, explosive growth, or turnover, every office needs a little help adding good, high-quality employees to their ranks from time to time. Hiring can be a time-consuming and stressful process, one that managers and team leaders probably don’t have time to do while they’re trying to keep the office running smoothly. 

If you think an administrative assistant as someone who fetches coffee, sorts the mail, and spends all day just answering phones and taking messages, it’s time for a reassessment.  An administrative assistant is a manager’s right and left hand. They keep the office running at top speed, with everything in its place and all deadlines kept top of mind.  Administrative assistants are of the utmost importance in busy offices and need to do a little bit of everything each day to be their most successful. 

There are only so many hours in a day and so many days in a week. As a leader, one of the most important skills you can cultivate is knowing when you take a task on yourself and when to delegate it to someone else.  Delegating responsibilities is not a symptom of laziness or ineffectiveness. It’s a way to prioritize your time while allowing others on your team to rise to the challenge and expand their skills. It’s also a way to show you trust your team to contribute, in an important way, on a big project. If you’ve ever wondered whether you’re delegating enough, that’s usually an indication you’re not. 

At a minimum, people spend 40 hours of their lives every week at work. Sometimes a little more, sometimes a little less, but that’s still a significant portion of their waking hours.  If employees feel like work is a place of stress, drudgery, or ruthless competition and pressure, they’re not going to enjoy coming to work. They’ll be more inclined to look for a way out or excuses for missing work, and that can hurt your overall productivity in addition to your bottom line.  The solution is to change your company’s culture and make it a more positive, reaffirming, and productive place to work. 

As you go through life and your career, there will come times when you need a little advice. Everyone needs some help or some perspective from time to time, and knowing you’ve got someone in your corner to help steer you in the right direction can make all the difference.  It’s important to find a good mentor, someone who knows where you’ve been and where you want to go and can help you achieve all your goals.  But how do you find a mentor -- more importantly, how can you find the right mentor for you? 

Have you found that the job you used to love has become more tedious? Do you feel stuck? Has your rise to the top of your respective ladder slowed to a crawl?  Your career might be stalling. But that’s no reason to panic. Recognizing the slowdown is a big step toward fixing the issue before it becomes a much bigger problem.  But first, it’s important to recognize the factors that might have contributed to this situation. 

Congratulations! After a long and sometimes frustrating process of applying for new positions, you’ve been asked for an interview. That’s wonderful!  There are two classic interview styles: The in-person and the over-the-phone. In some cases, one type of interview might lead to the other, so it’s best to do all you can to prepare for either outcome.  But as a job seeker, which kind is better? Do you want to go with the in-person, where you can see the responses to your answers, or the phone interview, where you can sit comfortably at home? 

We’ve all had bad days. Sometimes it feels like bad days stretch into weeks, and the next thing you know, it’s been a bad six months. It can be really easy to fall into a rut when nothing’s going the way you want, and it feels like the world, or at least work, is against you.  Is it time for an attitude adjustment? Does that even make a difference?  It might be -- and it can