manager advice Tag

As soon as the calendar flips to November, some might believe all bets are off when it comes to productivity. There are parties to think about, travel to book, dinners to cook, presents to make, and correspondences to keep up. Who has the time to do all that and work!? As a manager, it can be difficult to keep people focused on the tasks at hand. The end of the year is busy in an office, too, as year-end reports need to be completed, last-minute deals brokered, and contracts completed and signed before the clock strikes midnight on December 31.  You understand your employees trying to balance their home and work lives and get that things are hectic all around, but there are still deadlines to meet. How do you make sure everything gets done? 

We, humans, are imperfect creatures -- sad but true. Normally our quirks and preferences don’t make all that much difference in the world. Still, when reviewing resumes and hiring candidates, our unconscious biases can lead to an unfair and maybe even discriminatory set of practices.  Biases toward people who have things in common with us can be eliminated or at least held in check just by taking a few simple steps to ensure the pool of candidates is deep and wide. 

This year’s challenges have certainly made some aspects of doing business more complicated than normal. Instead of being able to bring people in for interviews, everything is done remotely. Keeping up with customers is now a matter of video chats and phone calls instead of meetings and conversations over coffee or meals.

Working remotely has some opportunities as well: No longer are your applicants limited to a specific geographic area. If working from home is part of your current model and your future expectations, it’s time to embrace some tactics for finding and hiring excellent talent quickly.

You don't want to attract just any job seeker. You want to attract one that will work for YOUR team.

There's another group of job seekers; however, people who are looking to find a place to make a professional home. They're looking for a way to advance and further their career, to put down roots and grow with a company as they advance through their career. These are the people you should look for when interviewing, the ones who should be called in for the second round, and the ones who can likely add the most to your team.

Starting a new job is an exciting time, from meeting new coworkers, getting acclimated on a team, and learning the way around a new building. New employees have a lot to learn to hit the ground running, including becoming familiar with a company’s culture.  Some employees are now going through the onboarding process in a remote-work environment, without sitting face-to-face with their new manager or other teammates.  But onboarding is even more important in uncertain times as it provides much-needed structure and guidance when everything else might seem shaky and unsure. 

There are only so many hours in a day and so many days in a week. As a leader, one of the most important skills you can cultivate is knowing when you take a task on yourself and when to delegate it to someone else.  Delegating responsibilities is not a symptom of laziness or ineffectiveness. It’s a way to prioritize your time while allowing others on your team to rise to the challenge and expand their skills. It’s also a way to show you trust your team to contribute, in an important way, on a big project. If you’ve ever wondered whether you’re delegating enough, that’s usually an indication you’re not.